Коктейль Rosemary Fizz Розмари физз

Rosemary is one of those herbs that’s never been on my radar untiI I started experimenting with Rosemary cocktails (then it took on the size of a 747). A robust herb that features a woody stem and needles similar to a pine tree, it may not be the first herb that comes to mind when mixing drinks, but it should be.

Rosemary has a fascinating history too. In the Middle Ages it was thought to be a love charm due to a close association with weddings, but in modern times it’s been a symbol of remembrance. Whatever the case, you’ll have a couple interesting facts to convey as you mix Rosemary cocktails for your guests.

What Does Rosemary Taste Like?

Rosemary has a very distinct flavor that has been described in many different ways. Strongly aromatic, I’d describe it as piney with a slightly peppery taste; there’s also a camphor-like quality which I associate to Vick’s VapoRub, but that’s my problem not yours

That said, overall it’s a very unique and distinct flavor that most people find pleasing and works well in a number of different herb cocktails.

How to Pronounce Rosemary

The pronunciation of the term Rosemary is uncomplicated, especially with an understanding of how it was named. The Legend says that the Virgin Mary spread her cloak over a white flowering bush; when the flowers turned the blue of her cloak the bush was the referred to as the “Rose of Mary”. But you can check the pronunciation for yourself:

Rosemary Cocktail Flavor Pairings

Used in many different types of dishes, Rosemary has proven itself to be diverse in the kitchen and that holds true for your home bar too. Generally it will work well with sweet, acidic flavors like citrus (Lemon, Lime & Orange), cranberry and tomato. I’ve also heard that the flavor of fresh apple really shines in Rosemary cocktails, but I haven’t experimented with that (yet).

2 Rosemary Cocktails to Get You Started

Sure Rosemary’s use with roasted meats and poultry might make you think about drinks for cooler temperatures, but it’s a killer ingredient for some delicious warm weather cocktails. Recently I’ve enjoyed combining it with lemon; hopefully you’ll enjoy these summer drinks too.

Rosemary Lemontini

Everyone loves the concept of a Martini but the idea of essentially drinking straight liquor can be off-putting to the beginning cocktailer. Enter the herby Rosemary Lemontini…

An easy to create cocktail that everyone will enjoy, this Martini knock-off requires minimal preparation but looks and tastes wonderful. I’ve found that using Rosemary-infused If you’re thinking about buying Simple Syrup in a store, don’t. Dissolve 1 cup of sugar in 1 cup of water over medium heat and you just saved some $.” >simple syrup (as mentioned in the Herb Cocktails Guide) is a good way to get great flavor without picking needles out of your mouth. Regardless, there’s no doubt your guests will love this one and it looks cool in the Martini glass.

Ingredients:

Preparation:

  • Combine Vodka, Lemon Juice, Simple Syrup, and 1 Sprig Rosemary in a Shaker
  • Fill Shaker With Ice and Shake 20 – 30 Times.
  • Strain Into a Chilled Martini Glass
  • Garnished with Lemon Twist and Rosemary

Rosemary Gin Fizz Cocktail

Another great warm weather option for those that enjoy Gin is this take on the classic Gin Fiz. Once again Rosemary-infused simple syrup is used to get full flavor without the woody bits.

Ingredients:

  • 2 oz. Gin
  • ½ oz. Fresh Lemon Juice
  • ½ oz. Rosemary Simple Syrup
  • Ice
  • 3 oz. Club Soda
  • 1 Lemon Slice (garnish)
  • 1 Rosemary Sprig (garnish)

Preparation:

  • Combine Gin, Lemon Juice and Simple Syrup in a Cocktail Shaker With Ice
  • Shake Briskly
  • Strain Into an 8 oz Glass Filled with Ice
  • Garnish with a Lemon slice and Rosemary Sprig

Коктейль Rosemary Fizz Розмари физз

This Winter Cranberry Gin Fizz Cocktail will impress all of your guests! It’s a twist on a classic gin fizz, made with an easy rosemary infused simple syrup and only a few ingredients!

Ooh la la! Why hello there, Christmas cocktail magic. What’s Christmas like in your house right now? Is your tree up and decorated? Have you bought a single gift? Are you like me and wondering how it’s already Friday the 8th?! Regardless of where you’re at, this is a cocktail that’ll brighten up your day completely. I wanted to have Christmas in a cup, but in a sophisticated and grown up way. This Winter Cranberry Gin Fizz Cocktail is exactly that. Oh, and the simple syrup is infused with cranberries and rosemary and smells HEAVENLY. Whether you’re a cocktail newbie like me, or would call yourself an experienced bartender, this easy cocktail will definitely impress your guests. You can make a single drink, or a bunch for friends, with only a few ingredients.

Читать еще:  Коктейль Tick Tock Тик-так

First things: like I sa >sangrias here, and mojitos there, but the one-on-one cocktail has always intim >gorgeous glasses , tools and okay okay, a stunning marble cheeseboard (because why not).

If I can conquer that, so can you if you’re super new to it. I’m not an expert, but I really enjoyed making this cocktail. It felt like back in my Jessiker Bakes days, filled with pure experimentation. It was FUN, and who doesn’t love fun?! I wanted to make it so easy for you, so I ensured that I only used a few ingredients here. The main contenders are the cranberries, the gin, and the rosemary. First I made a simple syrup, and infused it with rosemary and cranberries. That added a unique twist to it and a GORGEOUS blush colour.

Then, I added even more cranberries and some lime juice (which is always magic) to a cocktail shaker. I think this is a necessary step because it adds even more cranberry flavour, and even more of a pretty colour to this cocktail. It really turns up that winter feel. Then came the gin. I’ve always loved the clean taste of gin, and it goes with so many drinks, so I thought it would be great here. If you end up buying it just for this, know that it won’t go to waste because it can be used in a multitude of cocktails.


After some muddling, the gin then goes in, with the divine simple syrup. If you’re making this with room tempature ingredients for immediate use, then the ice is a great addition. It cools down the whole drink so quickly. Alternatively, you can make it all ahead of time, chill it, and then when your friends are over, add the ginger beer on top. It adds a nice fizziness and a welcoming complementary taste.

Whip this up and enjoy! P.S. I enjoyed 2 ounces of gin per glass, but feel free to use less. Also, I do not have a sweet tooth for drinks, so feel free to add more simple syrup! This by the tree + a Christmas movie = hello weekend.

Rosemary Gimlet


Some say, “You eat with your eyes.” I don’t know about you, but until my eyes start sporting incisors, I’ll continue to use my mouth. Especially when drinking cocktails.

I was recently at a bar that specialized in herbal concoctions and ordered a Rosemary Gimlet. I’ve been focusing a little more on gin these days, favoring an ice-cold martini over my usual whiskey or rye-based drinks. Partially because I was in the states and people kept making Manhattans and other cocktails way too sweet. One said-to-be reputable bar served me a Manhattan with extra maraschino cherry juice in the glass. If I wasn’t so respectful of bartenders, I would have lept over the bar and made her stop. What’s up with that?

I tend to like my cocktails on the tangy or on the rugged side, rather than too fruity or sweet. Herbs, I can go either way on. Rosemary in particular, is one of those herbs that if you use a little too much of it, the taste can be medicinal. But when I saw it paired with gin and lime juice on a bar menu in New York, I figured it would be a nice combination for a winter cocktail. And after my first sip, I was convinced that it was.

The only issue I had with the one that I’d ordered was that it was served in a thick glass, shaped like a deep cone tapering downward, resting on a base with no stem. It was more appropriate to what you might find at an airport lounge rather than an upscale cocktail bar, where drinks were going for $14 a pop, plus tax and tip. While chatting with the barman, I did mention that the cocktail was tasty, but the glass could have used an updating. He replied that that’s what they had on hand, which seemed a shame.

Читать еще:  Рецепты коктейлей на основе рома с соком

We may not be able to eat with our eyes (and if you can, please share a video…or, er, maybe not…), but how a cocktail tastes can depend on the glass. At least to me. Just like we all have our own favorite coffee cup, a cocktail glass provides a visceral experience that can’t always be explained. Wine pros will talk about how the shape of the glass focuses certain flavors of the wine to specific parts of your tongue that will enhance the experience, which is probably true. So is it too hard to want a cocktail in a proper glass? (And unless you’re from the south, hold the jam jars!)

A friend of mine told me about going to a swanky hotel in Manhattan for a martini, and her favorite part was the glass. She described it as having a curved shape, like a typical martini glass, but at the very top, right before the rim, the glass curved in just a little bit, which she reiterated with the tips of her index fingers cocking inwards. From that tiny gesture, I could tell exactly how that cold martini tasted as it slipped through her lips.

Ditto with a gimlet. Icy gin needs to be served in a stemmed glass, as your hands will warm the drink. When I’m roaming through thrift stores and flea markets, I pick up cocktail glasses when I see ones that interest me. For some reason, cocktail glasses tend to get broken more often than other glasses, which may be why some people just give up and use jam jars. (Spoiler: Those French “working glasses” that they sell for drinks in America, no one uses for drinks in France.) But being a thrifty guy, I buy cocktail glasses when they’re $1 a pop, if I can, and treat myself to a proper glass. Like the ones here that I bought at a Goodwill shop.

The name “Gimlet” sounds like something that might be sipped in a more genteel era, when the proper glass was de rigeur. Modern tastes now swap out fresh lime juice for the sweetened bottled stuff. And unless I didn’t get the memo, you can use any kind of gin that you like. I picked up this bottle of dry rye gin, made by St. George Spirits, perhaps hoping to capture some of the former glory of the rye whiskey-based Manhattans that I knew and loved so well.

I knew the Jörg Rupf, the German founder of the company, back when he was tinkering away with his oak barrels and distiller, in a hangar, making eau-de-vies and other spirits that few in America had ever heard of. (He once made a holly berry eau-de-vie that was kind of wacky, for Christmas. He also laughed about how little business he did: At the time, his biggest restaurant account went through 1/2 bottle of liquor every two months.) Now the company has shifted hands, right about the time cocktails reemerged in America, and seems to be going gangbusters.

Although Jörg has retired, the new team is doing some very interesting things, like this gin. I found the rye a bit too “present” for a martini, but was spot-on in this gimlet. But feel free to use a favorite gin, because you should always judge a liquor by the flavor, not by the bottle. Unless, of course, you drink with your eyes.

Rosemary Gimlet


Some say, “You eat with your eyes.” I don’t know about you, but until my eyes start sporting incisors, I’ll continue to use my mouth. Especially when drinking cocktails.

I was recently at a bar that specialized in herbal concoctions and ordered a Rosemary Gimlet. I’ve been focusing a little more on gin these days, favoring an ice-cold martini over my usual whiskey or rye-based drinks. Partially because I was in the states and people kept making Manhattans and other cocktails way too sweet. One said-to-be reputable bar served me a Manhattan with extra maraschino cherry juice in the glass. If I wasn’t so respectful of bartenders, I would have lept over the bar and made her stop. What’s up with that?

I tend to like my cocktails on the tangy or on the rugged side, rather than too fruity or sweet. Herbs, I can go either way on. Rosemary in particular, is one of those herbs that if you use a little too much of it, the taste can be medicinal. But when I saw it paired with gin and lime juice on a bar menu in New York, I figured it would be a nice combination for a winter cocktail. And after my first sip, I was convinced that it was.

Читать еще:  Как сделать коктейль Беллини в домашних условиях

The only issue I had with the one that I’d ordered was that it was served in a thick glass, shaped like a deep cone tapering downward, resting on a base with no stem. It was more appropriate to what you might find at an airport lounge rather than an upscale cocktail bar, where drinks were going for $14 a pop, plus tax and tip. While chatting with the barman, I did mention that the cocktail was tasty, but the glass could have used an updating. He replied that that’s what they had on hand, which seemed a shame.

We may not be able to eat with our eyes (and if you can, please share a video…or, er, maybe not…), but how a cocktail tastes can depend on the glass. At least to me. Just like we all have our own favorite coffee cup, a cocktail glass provides a visceral experience that can’t always be explained. Wine pros will talk about how the shape of the glass focuses certain flavors of the wine to specific parts of your tongue that will enhance the experience, which is probably true. So is it too hard to want a cocktail in a proper glass? (And unless you’re from the south, hold the jam jars!)

A friend of mine told me about going to a swanky hotel in Manhattan for a martini, and her favorite part was the glass. She described it as having a curved shape, like a typical martini glass, but at the very top, right before the rim, the glass curved in just a little bit, which she reiterated with the tips of her index fingers cocking inwards. From that tiny gesture, I could tell exactly how that cold martini tasted as it slipped through her lips.

Ditto with a gimlet. Icy gin needs to be served in a stemmed glass, as your hands will warm the drink. When I’m roaming through thrift stores and flea markets, I pick up cocktail glasses when I see ones that interest me. For some reason, cocktail glasses tend to get broken more often than other glasses, which may be why some people just give up and use jam jars. (Spoiler: Those French “working glasses” that they sell for drinks in America, no one uses for drinks in France.) But being a thrifty guy, I buy cocktail glasses when they’re $1 a pop, if I can, and treat myself to a proper glass. Like the ones here that I bought at a Goodwill shop.

The name “Gimlet” sounds like something that might be sipped in a more genteel era, when the proper glass was de rigeur. Modern tastes now swap out fresh lime juice for the sweetened bottled stuff. And unless I didn’t get the memo, you can use any kind of gin that you like. I picked up this bottle of dry rye gin, made by St. George Spirits, perhaps hoping to capture some of the former glory of the rye whiskey-based Manhattans that I knew and loved so well.

I knew the Jörg Rupf, the German founder of the company, back when he was tinkering away with his oak barrels and distiller, in a hangar, making eau-de-vies and other spirits that few in America had ever heard of. (He once made a holly berry eau-de-vie that was kind of wacky, for Christmas. He also laughed about how little business he did: At the time, his biggest restaurant account went through 1/2 bottle of liquor every two months.) Now the company has shifted hands, right about the time cocktails reemerged in America, and seems to be going gangbusters.

Although Jörg has retired, the new team is doing some very interesting things, like this gin. I found the rye a bit too “present” for a martini, but was spot-on in this gimlet. But feel free to use a favorite gin, because you should always judge a liquor by the flavor, not by the bottle. Unless, of course, you drink with your eyes.

Ссылка на основную публикацию
Adblock
detector